International Science Index

3
10011128
School and Teacher Level Predictors for Students’ Information Literacy in Chinese Rural and Urban Education
Abstract:

This study aimed to investigate the level of secondary school students’ information literacy in China and examine the contribution of school and teacher level factors on students’ information literacy between rural and urban schools. A total of 598 schools, 56415 students and 18286 teachers participated in this study. The findings of this study were as follows: (1) the overall of secondary schools students’ information literacy only reached an average level and urban school students’ information literacy were significantly higher than that of rural school students; (2) In rural schools, teachers’ ICT collaboration was a positive predictor for students’ information literacy, while teachers’ ICT use for learning was identified as a negative predictor of students’ information literacy; (3) In urban schools, ICT management, ICT operation and teachers’ ICT self-efficacy were found to be significantly associated with students’ information literacy. Based on the findings, suggestions for improving students’ information literacy between rural and urban schools were discussed.

Paper Detail
26
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2
10004232
Equity and Diversity in Bangladesh’s Primary Education: Struggling Indigenous Children
Abstract:

This paper describes how indigenous students face challenges with various school activities due to inadequate equity and diversity principles in mainstream primary schools in Bangladesh. This study focuses on indigenous students’ interactions with mainstream class teachers and students through teaching-learning activities at public primary schools. Ethnographic research methods guided data collection under a case study methodology in Chittagong Hill Tracts (CHTs) region where maximum indigenous peoples’ inhabitants. The participants (class teachers) shared information through in-depth interviews about their experiences in the four selecting schools. The authors also observed the effects of school activities by use of equity and diversity lens for indigenous students’ situations in those schools. The authors argue that the socio-economic situations of indigenous families are not supportive of the educational development of their children. Similarly, the Bangladesh government does not have enough initiative programs based on equity and diversity principles for fundamental education of indigenous children at rural schools level. Besides this, the conventional teaching system cannot improve the diversification among the students in classrooms. The principles of equity and diversity are not well embedded in professional development of teachers, and using teaching materials in classrooms. The findings suggest that implementing equitable education; there are needed to arrange teachers’ education with equitable knowledge and introducing diversified teaching materials, and implementing teaching through students centered activities that promote the diversification among the multicultural students.

Paper Detail
1215
downloads
1
9997324
Challenges for Rural School Leaders in a Developing Context: The Case of Solomon Islands
Abstract:

Thirty-eight rural school leaders in Solomon Islands responded to a questionnaire aimed at identifying their perceptions of work challenges. The data analysis points to an overwhelming percentage of school leaders feeling they face multifaceted problems in their work settings, including such challenges as untrained teachers, lack of funding, limited learning and teaching resources, and land disputes. The latter in particular is beyond the school leader’s jurisdiction; addressing it needs urgent attention from the principal stakeholder(s). Such challenges, seemingly tangential to the business of schooling, inadvertently affect the provision of good-quality education. The findings demonstrate that contextual challenges raise questions about what powers leadership at school level has to deal with some of them. The suggestion is advanced for the significant place-conscious leadership development to help address some community and cultural challenges. Implications of this paper are likely to be relevant to other similar contexts in the Pacific region and beyond.

Paper Detail
4176
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